Home | Contact | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms and conditions
User Name
Password
Depression from Panic/Anxiety Please post any messages here about Depression that is directly related to Panic and anxiety.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 29-04-14, 01:02
venusbluejeans's Avatar
venusbluejeans venusbluejeans is offline
UK administrator / Queen of overthinking
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 6,075
Depression Self-Help and Coping Tips

Depression drains your energy, hope, and drive, making it difficult to do what you need to feel better. But while overcoming depression isn’t quick or easy, it’s far from impossible. You can’t beat it through sheer willpower, but you do have some control—even if your depression is severe and stubbornly persistent. The key is to start small and build from there. Feeling better takes time, but you can get there if you make positive choices for yourself each day.

The road to depression recovery

Recovering from depression requires action, but taking action when you’re depressed is hard. In fact, just thinking about the things you should do to feel better, like going for a walk or spending time with friends, can be exhausting.
It’s the Catch-22 of depression recovery: The things that help the most are the things that are the most difficult to do. There’s a difference, however, between something that's difficult and something that's impossible.

Start small and stay focused

The key to depression recovery is to start with a few small goals and slowly build from there.Draw upon whatever resources you have. You may not have much energy, but you probably have enough to take a short walk around the block or pick up the phone to call a loved one.
Take things one day at a time and reward yourself for each accomplishment. The steps may seem small, but they’ll quickly add up. And for all the energy you put into your depression recovery, you’ll get back much more in return.

Depression self-help tip 1: Cultivate supportive relationships

Getting the support you need plays a big role in lifting the fog of depression and keeping it away. On your own, it can be difficult to maintain perspective and sustain the effort required to beat depression, but the very nature of depression makes it difficult to reach out for help. However, isolation and loneliness make depression even worse, so maintaining your close relationships and social activities are important.
The thought of reaching out to even close family members and friends can seem overwhelming. You may feel ashamed, too exhausted to talk, or guilty for neglecting the relationship. Remind yourself that this is the depression talking. Reaching out is not a sign of weakness and it won’t mean you’re a burden to others. Your loved ones care about you and want to help. And remember, it’s never too late to build new friendships and improve your support network.
  • Turn to trusted friends and family members. Share what you’re going through with the people you love and trust, face to face if possible. The people you talk to don’t have to be able to fix you; they just need to be good listeners. Ask for the help and support you need. You may have retreated from your most treasured relationships, but they can get you through this tough time.
  • Try to keep up with social activities even if you don’t feel like it. Often when you’re depressed, it feels more comfortable to retreat into your shell, but being around other people will make you feel less depressed.
  • Join a support group for depression. Being with others dealing with depression can go a long way in reducing your sense of isolation. You can also encourage each other, give and receive advice on how to cope, and share your experiences.

    Depression self-help tip 2: Challenge negative thinking

    Depression puts a negative spin on everything, including the way you see yourself, the situations you encounter, and your expectations for the future.
    But you can’t break out of this pessimistic mind frame by “just thinking positive.” Happy thoughts or wishful thinking won’t cut it. Rather, the trick is to replace negative thoughts with more balanced thoughts.

  • Ways to challenge negative thinking:
  • Think outside yourself. Ask yourself if you’d say what you’re thinking about yourself to someone else. If not, stop being so hard on yourself. Think about less harsh statements that offer more realistic descriptions.
  • Allow yourself to be less than perfect. Many depressed people are perfectionists, holding themselves to impossibly high standards and then beating themselves up when they fail to meet them. Battle this source of self-imposed stress by challenging your negative ways of thinking
  • Socialize with positive people. Notice how people who always look on the bright side deal with challenges, even minor ones, like not being able to find a parking space. Then consider how you would react in the same situation. Even if you have to pretend, try to adopt their optimism and persistence in the face of difficulty.
  • Keep a “negative thought log." Whenever you experience a negative thought, jot down the thought and what triggered it in a notebook. Review your log when you’re in a good mood. Consider if the negativity was truly warranted. Ask yourself if there’s another way to view the situation. For example, let’s say your boyfriend was short with you and you automatically assumed that the relationship was in trouble. It's possible, though, he’s just having a bad day.
Types of negative thinking that add to depression

All-or-nothing thinking – Looking at things in black-or-white categories, with no middle ground (“If I fall short of perfection, I’m a total failure.”)

Overgeneralization – Generalizing from a single negative experience, expecting it to hold true forever (“I can’t do anything right.”)

The mental filter – Ignoring positive events and focusing on the negative. Noticing the one thing that went wrong, rather than all the things that went right.

Diminishing the positive – Coming up with reasons why positive events don’t count (“She said she had a good time on our date, but I think she was just being nice.”)

Jumping to conclusions – Making negative interpretations without actual evidence. You act like a mind reader (“He must think I’m pathetic”) or a fortune teller (“I’ll be stuck in this dead end job forever”)

Emotional reasoning – Believing that the way you feel reflects reality (“I feel like such a loser. I really am no good!”)

‘Shoulds’ and ‘should-nots’ – Holding yourself to a strict list of what you should and shouldn’t do, and beating yourself up if you don’t live up to your rules.

Labeling – Labeling yourself based on mistakes and perceived shortcomings (“I’m a failure; an idiot; a loser.”)

Depression self-help tip 3: Take care of yourself

In order to overcome depression, you have to take care of yourself. This includes following a healthy lifestyle, learning to manage stress, setting limits on what you’re able to do, adopting healthy habits, and scheduling fun activities into your day.

  • Aim for eight hours of sleep. Depression typically involves sleep problems. Whether you’re sleeping too little or too much, your mood suffers. Get on a better sleep schedule
  • Expose yourself to a little sunlight every day. Lack of sunlight can make depression worse. Make sure you’re getting enough. Take a short walk outdoors, have your coffee outside, enjoy an al fresco meal, people-watch on a park bench, or sit out in the garden. Aim for at least 15 minutes of sunlight a day to boost your mood. If you live somewhere with little winter sunshine, try using a light therapy box.
  • Keep stress in check Not only does stress prolong and worsen depression, but it can also trigger it. Figure out all the things in your life that stress you out. Examples include: work overload, unsupportive relationships, taking on too much, or health problems. Once you’ve identified your stressors, you can make a plan to avoid them or minimize their impact.
  • Practice relaxation techniques A daily relaxation practice can help relieve symptoms of depression, reduce stress, and boost feelings of joy and well-being. Try yoga, deep breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, or meditation.
  • care for a pet While nothing can replace the human connection, pets can bring joy and companionship into your life and help you feel less isolated. Caring for a pet can also get you outside of yourself and give you a sense of being needed—both powerful antidotes to depression.

Do things you enjoy (or used to)

While you can’t force yourself to have fun or experience pleasure, you can choose to do things that you used to enjoy. Pick up a former hobby or a sport you used to like. Express yourself creatively through music, art, or writing. Go out with friends. Take a day trip.

Push yourself to do things, even when you don’t feel like it. You might be surprised at how much better you feel once you’re out in the world. Even if your depression doesn’t lift immediately, you’ll gradually feel more upbeat and energetic as you make time for fun activities.


Depression self-help tip 4: Get regular exercise

When you’re depressed, exercising may be the last thing you feel like doing. But exercise is a powerful tool in dealing with depression In fact, studies show that regular exercise can be as effective as antidepressant medication at increasing energy levels and decreasing feelings of fatigue.
Scientists haven’t figured out exactly why exercise is such a potent antidepressant, but evidence suggests that physical activity triggers new cell growth in the brain, increases mood-enhancing neurotransmitters and endorphins, reduces stress, and relieves muscle tension—all things that can have a positive effect on depression.
To gain the most benefits, aim for 30 minutes of exercise per day. You can start small, though, as short 10-minute bursts of activity can have a positive effect on your mood. Here are a few easy ways to get moving:

  • Take the stairs rather than the elevator
  • Park your car in the farthest spot in the car park
  • Take your dog for a walk
  • Pair up with an exercise partner
  • Walk while you’re talking on the phone
As a next step, try incorporating walks or some other enjoyable, easy form of exercise into your daily routine. The key is to pick an activity you enjoy, so you’re more likely to keep up with it.


Exercise as an Antidepressant

The following exercise tips offer a powerful prescription for boosting mood:
  • Exercise now… and again. A 10-minute walk can improve your mood for two hours. The key to sustaining mood benefits is to exercise regularly.
  • Choose activities that are moderately intense. Aerobic exercise undoubtedly has mental health benefits, but you don't need to sweat strenuously to see results.
  • Find exercises that are continuous and rhythmic (rather than intermittent). Walking, swimming, dancing, stationery biking, and yoga are good choices.
  • Add a mind-body element. Activities such as yoga and tai chi rest your mind and increase your energy. You can also add a meditative element to walking or swimming by repeating a mantra (a word or phrase) as you move.
  • Start slowly, and don't overdo it. More isn't better. Athletes who over train find their moods drop rather than lift.
Adapted from Johns Hopkins Health Alerts


Depression self-help tip 5: Eat a healthy, mood-boosting diet

What you eat has a direct impact on the way you feel. Aim for a balanced diet of low-fat protein, complex carbohydrates, fruits and vegetables. Reduce your intake of foods that can adversely affect your brain and mood, such as caffeine, alcohol, trans fats, saturated fats, and foods with high levels of chemical preservatives or hormones (such as certain meats).
  • Don’t skip meals. Going too long between meals can make you feel irritable and tired, so aim to eat something at least every three to four hours.
  • Minimize sugar and refined carbs. You may crave sugary snacks, baked goods, or comfort foods such as pasta or French fries, but these “feel-good” foods quickly lead to a crash in mood and energy.
  • Focus on complex carbohydrates. Foods such as baked potatoes, whole-wheat pasta, oatmeal, and whole grain breads can boost serotonin levels without a crash.
  • Boost your B vitamins. Deficiencies in B vitamins such as folic acid and B-12 can trigger depression. To get more, take a B-complex vitamin supplement or eat more citrus fruit, leafy greens, beans, chicken, and eggs.
  • Try super-foods rich in nutrients that can boost mood, such as bananas (magnesium to decrease anxiety, vitamin B6 to promote alertness, tryptophan to boost feel-good serotonin levels), brown rice (serotonin, thiamine to support sociability), and spinach (magnesium, folate to reduce agitation and improve sleep).
  • Consider taking a chromium supplement. Some depression studies show that chromium picolinate reduces carbohydrate cravings, eases mood swings, and boosts energy. Supplementing with chromium picolinate is especially effective for people who tend to overeat and oversleep when depressed.

Omega-3 fatty acids play an essential role in stabilizing mood.

  • Foods rich in certain omega-3 fats called EPA and DHA can give your mood a big boost.The best sources are fatty fish such as salmon, herring, mackerel, anchovies, sardines, and some cold-water fish oil supplements. Canned albacore tuna and lake trout can also be good sources, depending on how the fish were raised and processed. When cooking fish, grill or bake rather than fry.
  • You may hear a lot about getting your omega-3s from foods rich in ALA fatty acids, such as vegetable oils and nuts (especially walnuts), flax, soybeans, and tofu. Be aware that our bodies generally convert very little ALA into EPA and DHA, so you may not see as big of a benefit.
  • Some people avoid seafood because they worry about mercury or other possible toxins, but most experts agree that the benefits of eating one or two servings a week of cold-water fatty fish outweigh the risks.

Depression self-help tip 6: Know when to get additional help

If you find your depression getting worse and worse, seek professional help Needing additional help doesn’t mean you’re weak. Sometimes the negative thinking in depression can make you feel like you’re a lost cause, but depression can be treated and you can feel better!
Don’t forget about these self-help tips, though. Even if you’re receiving professional help, these tips can be part of your treatment plan, speeding your recovery and preventing depression from returning.

taken from - http://www.helpguide.org/mental/depression_tips.htm a really useful site for all of you who are suffering from depression at the minute..... take a look

©Helpguide.org. All rights reserved. Helpguide.org is an ad-free non-profit resource for supporting better mental health and lifestyle choices for adults and children.
__________________

Emmz xx


nolite te basstardes carborundorum

Currently studying - CACHE Level 2 Certificate in Awareness of Mental Health Problems

Please help keep NMP running and donate to the running costs:
http://www.nomorepanic.co.uk/donate

FREE online CBT course....give it a go... what have you got to lose????..
https://cbt4panic.org/



Last edited by venusbluejeans; 02-05-14 at 11:52.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 29-04-14, 01:45
Fishmanpa Fishmanpa is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 15,668
Re: Depression Self-Help and Coping Tips

Excellent post VBJ....

Having dealt with depression due to health issues, this advice is right on...

Positive thoughts... (helps beat depression!)
__________________
"Eat. Drink. Enjoy the work you do. Be thankful for the blessings God gives you in this life. Live, love and seek out the things that bring your heart joy. The rest is meaningless... Like chasing the wind." King Solomon

The best help is the help you give yourself! http://cbt4panic.org/
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 29-04-14, 12:16
Tanner40 Tanner40 is offline
Advanced Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 1,140
Re: Depression Self-Help and Coping Tips

Fantastic post, Venus. More people need to really read this. Spot on! Thank you for posting something so helpful.
__________________
Tanner
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-05-14, 10:01
Cú Chulainn's Avatar
Cú Chulainn Cú Chulainn is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 187
Re: Depression Self-Help and Coping Tips


Great Post Venus, Particularly the exercise bit.
You should get this ''sticked'' to the top of the page so others can see it..

Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-06-14, 17:13
Cú Chulainn's Avatar
Cú Chulainn Cú Chulainn is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 187
Re: Depression Self-Help and Coping Tips

Yay!
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-06-14, 19:30
SADnomore's Avatar
SADnomore SADnomore is offline
Advanced Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 1,018
Re: Depression Self-Help and Coping Tips

Wow! I'm going to print this. Very helpful, VBJ, thank you so much! xx
Marie
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-06-14, 20:19
Deepthinker Deepthinker is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 225
Re: Depression Self-Help and Coping Tips

Wonderful post!!! Thanks for posting! It is always a comfort to read that depression doesn't have to win.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 07-07-14, 18:44
fduop's Avatar
fduop fduop is offline
Intermediate Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 680
Re: Depression Self-Help and Coping Tips

Thanks VBJ for pointing me to the website. Will certainly put some of this into practice.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 13-08-15, 22:29
Yorkshire born Yorkshire born is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 41
Re: Depression Self-Help and Coping Tips

This post has helped me so much. Thank you.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 21-08-15, 23:50
Genoire's Avatar
Genoire Genoire is offline
Advanced Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 856
Re: Depression Self-Help and Coping Tips

I've noticed when I feel totally hopeless and depressed, I talk to my mom. She usually recommends I do something...like go out, work on a craft, or come watch a funny TV show with her. My instinct is to say no and just stay in bed brooding, but I really try and force myself to do what she recommends, or at list try it for a few minutes to half an hour. It doesn't always pull me out of my dark mood, but sometimes it does help. I find watching funny TV shows with my family and playing with my dogs helps tremendously. Doing nothing but stewing when I'm depressed is the worst thing I can do. The longer I stay in bed or just sitting there the worse and more hopeless I feel.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
coping, depression, selfhelp, tips


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Coping Tips claire_2910 General Anxiety / Generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) 5 16-03-14 14:03
any tips on coping? so down right now emetophobia laurenmae Emetophobia 0 29-09-12 19:16
Tips on coping with a train journey MikeyT General Anxiety / Generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) 9 29-03-10 21:15
IBS any tips on coping????? kazzie IBS (Irritable Bowel Syndrome), Bowel, Stomach problems 4 09-02-08 22:25
Any Tips For Coping Tonight?? dj9928 General Anxiety / Generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) 4 01-01-07 10:59


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.