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maisiesmumx
22-01-08, 16:10
Hiya i have just come back from the regular visit to the therapist...who seems to repaet the same mantra each time i go, its like they have no new suggestions..she told me to RELAX yeh okay if i could relax i would not suffer in the first place..she told me to get more pleasure out of life....i felt like screaming at her...how can i when i live in on this stupid merry go round of a brain of mine....the reason i can not get any plaesure is because of this constant dp/dr and silly irrational panicky thoughts....sorry to ramble but i ahve had zero sleep this last couple of weeks ...does anyone else see a cbt that might ahave any new suggestions that may help...

with love faith:wacko: :huh: :shrug:

krisg910
23-01-08, 00:59
hey i felt the same feelings and thoughts about visits to my phsyciatrist. same questions,answers and advice every session. i was recently told that they do this in the hope that ur brain will evenchaly listen and take the advice/suggestions on board. as for me i stopped going after abt 5 sessions felt it was pointless.

now i have a support worker which i feel is a great help and support as yheu actully do pratical things with u like- go out for walks with u,go shoppin,discuss and help u decide what is the best way to go to beat this prob.

maybe you could ask ur doc if there is a mental health team in your area and see if u can get reffered to them. i feel that some 1 taking the steps with u is alot easier than some1 telling u what to do and leaving u to do it alone.

hope my post is helpful kris xx

Amilie
23-01-08, 10:55
Hey,

I have been having CBT for over a year now and I don't know how I coped without it. I did see one before but stopped going after about 3 sessons as she didn't help. The one I see now though is amazing. She lets me go at my own pace and explains the reasons behind everything she says/does. CBT is repetitive by nature because it is working at changing your thought processes that are causing the panic. For example, I used to always think about going home if I felt panicky as I would only be "safe" there. Now I have taught my brain to see myself as my safe place so it doesn't matter where I am. This was a very slow process and involved lots of thought challenging, mantras, afiramations and exposure.
I do remember when I first went and she went on and on about breathing properly when I felt panicky. I didn't believe that breathing differently could stop my panic but she told me to trust her so I gave it a go. After two weeks I noticed an amazing difference and now I can just use that to stop panicking. Once I understood the physiology behind what was happening when I panicked I could see how these things worked, soemthing that CBT taught me.

My advice is to talk to your therapist about your feelings and get her to go over the process again. Failing that, find another one. Sometimes it comes down to personality clashes (that's why I didn't get anything out of the first one). I would also do some reading up on CBT and how it works and what it does. Maybe get a self-help book that uses CBT techniques.

But don't give up on it. I have suffered for 8 years now and tried everything! CBT is the only thing that fundamentally changes the way you think and at the end of the day that is what panic is. Thoughts that create fear.
Obviously this is just my opinion, I studied it for a degree so am a fan! But different things work for different people.

If you want any more info about CBT then let me know, I'd be happy to help.

Eva May
23-01-08, 16:41
My CBT is a book. I have seen two human CBT's and found neither of them very helpful. I'm not saying the book is the answer to my prayers just yet but it's a nice change of pace