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Paroxetine

Paroxetine (Paxil, Seroxat )

No More Panic forum posts about this medication can be found here: Seroxat / Paroxetine

Paroxetine is a phenylpiperidine antidepressant that inhibits the reuptake of Serotonin (SSRI ).

This drug is licenced for use in OCD (obsessive-compulsive disorder) depression, panic attacks / disorder, social phobia, PTSD and GAD .

When a person suffers from depression or anxiety disorders, there could be a problem with the serotonin balance and its effect on cell-to-cell communication.

Paxil blocks serotonin from being reabsorbed back into the sender nerve cell. This process increases the amount of serotonin available to be absorbed by the receiver cell and can help message transmission return to normal.

Benefits Seen

  • Within four to six weeks. There has been extensive media and scientific coverage over this drug and its safety

The greatest area for concern is when starting the drug, titrating doses and especially when coming off this medication. These are the times when the patient should be monitored extremely closely for signs of emotional instability, aggressiveness, suicidal thoughts or ideation.

If Stop Taking

  • Do not stop without consulting your doctor and never abruptly.
  • This medication must be weaned off extremely slowly to avoid potential withdrawal syndrome

Overdose symptoms include

  • Drowsiness or vomiting.

Warnings

If stopped abruptly withdrawal syndromes have been reported with his medicine, in the form of confusion, dizziness, sweating or tremors and untoward behaviour, suicidal tendencies and aggressiveness.

  • Do not take this drug if you are pregnant
  • Do not take this drug if planning to become pregnant.
  • Do not take if you are breast-feeding.
  • Do not drink alcohol when taking this drug.
  • Do not give this drug to children under eighteen. If over sixty only use drug in small doses and with close monitoring of it’s side effects.

Do not use if

You had negative reactions to this drug or any drug in this class in the past. If you have taken any MAO inhibitors in the last 14 days. If you have any type of seizures (epilepsy or convulsions).

Inform your Doctor if

  • You had negative reactions to this drug or any drug in this class in the past.
  • If you have taken any MAO inhibitors in the last 14 days.
  • If you have a history of liver or kidney problems.
  • If you are taking any other prescription or non-prescription drug.
  • If you plan to be under anesthesia or having any surgery in the next few months, also if you will be under-going any medical tests.

Symptoms or Side Effects

Common

  • Blurred vision
  • Nausea
  • Chills
  • Constipation
  • Diarrheoa
  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Insomnia
  • Itching
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nervousness
  • Palpitations
  • Sedation
  • Skin rash
  • Sweating
  • Taste disorders
  • Tingling in hands
  • Sexual side effects
  • Upset stomach
  • Weakness

Rare

  • Abnormal movements of mouth/face
  • Abnormal sensation of motion
  • Hypomania
  • Liver toxicity
  • Seizures
  • Weight loss/gain

See doctor always

  • Blurred vision
  • Dizziness
  • Hypomania
  • Headache
  • Palpitations
  • Skin rash
  • Sweating
  • Taste disorders
  • Tingling in hands
  • Weakness

See doctor if severe

  • Constipation
  • Chills
  • Diarrheoa
  • Insomnia
  • Itching
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea
  • Nervousness
  • Sedation
  • Upset stomach
  • Weight loss/gain

See doctor NOW

  • Liver toxicity
  • Skin rash
  • Seizures
  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Unusaual behaviour

STUDIES:

07/01/2004 Anti-Depressant Side-Effects Investigation to be Widened in UK WMRC Daily Analysis. The UK’s Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHPRA) is to initiate a new study into whether patients using anti-depressants are more likely to commit suicide. The investigation will focus on two particular classes of anti-depressant – selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) – and analyse the role of these products in potentially increasing the incidence of completed suicides, suicidal thoughts, non-fatal overdoses and self laceration. The study will utilise the Full Feature General Practice Research Database (FF-GPRD) and focus on all patients diagnosed with depression between 1995 and 2001. Significance: Having already made an official recommendation that SSRIs should not be used off-label for paediatric use, the MHPRA’s latest study marks a widening of scope in its ongoing investigation into anti-depressant side-effects. GlaxoSmithKline’s (UK) popular SSRI Seroxat/Paxil (paroxetine) has again come under the spotlight, being specifically named in one of the MHPRA’s study models (SSRI exposure by therapy duration compared with paroxetine). This is most likely due to its position as the most widely prescribed SSRI in the UK, although the MHPRA had earlier ruled against its use among children. Pressure groups comprising former and existing Seroxat/Paxil patients continue to call for re-labelling of the product due to various alleged side-effects .