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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    , , United Kingdom.
    Posts
    15

    High pulse rate under little exertion.

    Hi all.

    I was wondering if anyone else experienced a high pulse rate when working out at the gym without really pushing themselves.

    I accept that I am unfit as I have been inactive for quite some time and my job has got less and less active as the years have gone by, but I was surprised how my pulse rocketed up to 140-160 + after a matter of minutes without a great deal of effort. I was not out of breath at all and my resting pulse rate is normally around 80.I am 32 years old 6ft - 16 stone (lost a stone in last couple of months)

    What I am asking is..

    Is this because I am unfit?

    Is this because I suffer from anxiety? (Not feeling particularly anxious at the moment, although I have been worrying about my heart of late)

    If this is because I have only just started going to the gym, can I expect that it will take more effort to get my pulse up to this level as I get fitter (I have been told that only recovery rate decreases)

    I am trying to sort myself out, but I am worried that the machines I am using say my pulse rate is so high.

    Thanks to anyone who may have some advice.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    , , United Kingdom.
    Posts
    85

    Re: High pulse rate under little exertion.

    Hi Sage,

    I'm no expert in this area, however, as I'm sure you know we all have a target pulse rate for exercise. In most cases during exercise you should aim for 60-80% of (220-your age).

    So for you (220-32) *(.6 or .8) = between 112.8 and 150.

    So infact, the figures you have detailed do in some instances fall into your target pulse rate.

    However, I would say please don't go pushing yourself beyond your limits. Your BMI suggests you are overweight, I think you probably know that and it is great you are doing something about it, but please take it as a steady progress and you can always consult your GP or local nurse over these issues.

    Personally I try and avoid continual monitoring of myself, because our bodies are complex machines and can produce all sorts of readings for a range of perfectly normal reasons.

    Exercise can be great, it can help reduce anxiety and aid mental well being as well as reducing body fat, cholesterol and blood pressure measurement. I do also think you are right that recovery of your pulse to resting levels is the sign of fitness, but also athletes tend to have lower pulse rates at rest, I'm not sure how that fits in with pulse rates when they exercise.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    , , USA.
    Posts
    284

    Re: High pulse rate under little exertion.

    Okay, this is a topic more appropriate under the general forum but I will provide a response.

    Sedentary lifestyle produces a number of effects on the body, one of which is greater demand on the heart under diminished exertion. Efficiency under such conditions is less than when the body is conditioned and reduced oxygen exchange produces greater demand by the heart and lungs to restore balance. As conditioning improves, the distance between demand and response improves. Resting heart rate decreases and performance is improved because the heart and lungs do not have to work as hard to create exchange necessary for demand.

    Exercising over extended periods, first beginning with 10 to 20 minutes of cardiovascular exercise, then extending by ten minutes or so each week until you reach a satisfactory level for the chosen goal. Remember to stay well-hydrated and eat properly, getting plenty of rest as well. You can benefit greatly by researching exercise programs online to determine an appropriate regimen for best results. In all cases, however, always break from any routine if you become exhausted because it does not improve stamina.

    It is highly unlikely that at 32 years of age, you are suffering from cardiac insufficiency of any type, particularly in light of the fact that you state no other symptoms are present. This is most likely a simple case of poor conditioning due to sedentary lifestyle. Things will improve over time with a steady regimen and discipline to your exercise program.
    __________________
    Best regards and Good Health

  4. #4

    Re: High pulse rate under little exertion.

    Wow, 160-180 in a matter of minutes is extraordinary. But it's not life threatening. You are quite heavy for your height, abate the thought that it may be muscle or your build, which would add extra strain; you're unfit, adding more strain, you're worrying about it, adding yet more strain... i think it's a combination of everything.

    If you are worried go to a personal trainer or something at the gym i'm sure you'll get some information. And if he's worried, he'll refer you to a GP.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    , , United Kingdom.
    Posts
    15

    Re: High pulse rate under little exertion.

    Quote Originally Posted by RLR View Post
    Okay, this is a topic more appropriate under the general forum but I will provide a response.

    Sedentary lifestyle produces a number of effects on the body, one of which is greater demand on the heart under diminished exertion. Efficiency under such conditions is less than when the body is conditioned and reduced oxygen exchange produces greater demand by the heart and lungs to restore balance. As conditioning improves, the distance between demand and response improves. Resting heart rate decreases and performance is improved because the heart and lungs do not have to work as hard to create exchange necessary for demand.

    Exercising over extended periods, first beginning with 10 to 20 minutes of cardiovascular exercise, then extending by ten minutes or so each week until you reach a satisfactory level for the chosen goal. Remember to stay well-hydrated and eat properly, getting plenty of rest as well. You can benefit greatly by researching exercise programs online to determine an appropriate regimen for best results. In all cases, however, always break from any routine if you become exhausted because it does not improve stamina.

    It is highly unlikely that at 32 years of age, you are suffering from cardiac insufficiency of any type, particularly in light of the fact that you state no other symptoms are present. This is most likely a simple case of poor conditioning due to sedentary lifestyle. Things will improve over time with a steady regimen and discipline to your exercise program.

    Thanks for your reply.

    Could someome please move the thread if it is in the wrong place?
    Thanks

    I have been experiencing chest pain, but not when excersising.

    I have noticed that if I fold my arms the pain/sensations i feel in my chest dissapear
    Last edited by MrB; 07-03-07 at 12:07.

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